Recruiters Share 10 Common Resume Mistakes

Via Work Goes Strong …

Here’s an excellent piece that covers some of the major mistakes job seekers make when constructing their resumes.

Author Leslie Ayers writes:

If you read my column regularly, you know I believe a great resume is like the golden ticket to the job you really want. It tells a potential employer what you can do for them, and establishes you in their mind as someone they want to meet.

As an added bonus, a great resume makes you feel more confident in your job search, and it serves as a guide in an interview so that all of the important things someone should know about you are covered.

Click here to read the entire article >>

The Modern History of the Resume

Via …

The role of the resume has remained constant throughout its 500 years of existence — the point of the resume is to get a job.

Relative to other forms of communication, though, it hasn’t changed all that much. In fact, most of the changes have been merely cosmetic — most employers still require a one-sheet, black-and-white printed resume at interviews, regardless of the fact that we all use email and have had access to much better design options for years now. Not to mention, printing is unnecessary in the digital world we live in. At this point, even the role of cover letters in today’s job market is being scrutinized.

Click here to read the entire article >>

Will You Pass a Social Media Background Check?

Of course you already know to be careful regarding what you post and write on social media sites, right? Think you’ve been careful enough?

As “social media” background checks become more commonplace, you might be surprised as to just how much seemingly innocuous information can be used against you.

Mat Honan of Gizmodo just published a great piece on how he actually failed a “social media” background check. He writes:

We ran background checks on six Gizmodo employees, including our editor in chief Joe Brown, and all but one came back clean. When it doesn’t find anything incriminating on a potential employee, it simply issues a notice that the employees passed (see below) and doesn’t generate a file.

And then there’s me. I flunked hard. When that happens, Social Intelligence creates a report, which it would then send to an employer. And if you don’t get a job because of your social media report, you can request a copy. Mine’s filled with delightful details, like “subject admits to use of cocaine as well as LSD,” and “subject references use of Ketamine.”

Basically, I may never work again.

Check out the entire piece when you get a chance. It’s quite enlightening:

Young job-seekers hiding their Facebook pages

Via …

A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft found that 70 percent of recruiters and hiring managers in the United States have rejected an applicant based on information they found online.

What kind of information? “Inappropriate” comments by the candidate; “unsuitable” photos and videos; criticisms of previous employers, co-workers, or clients; and even inappropriate comments by friends and relatives, according to the survey report, titled “Online Reputation in a Connected World.”

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More college grads use social media to find jobs

Via USA Today …

Here’s a study tip for employers who want to hire top-notch college grads: Bone up on social media.

Nearly 28% of college students plan to seek employment using LinkedIn, up from 5% last year, according to a survey out today from employee recognition provider I Love Rewards and career-services network Experience. Slightly more than 7% plan to use Facebook, up from 5%.

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